Posts Tagged ‘Organic Eye Cream’

Organic Face Cream : Dangers of Parabens

Thursday, July 15th, 2010

There is a lot of talk about the dangers of parabens, yet they are still being used as a preservative quite extensively in the skin care and cosmetics industry. When we read the reports carefully, however, most of the articles are short on facts but still strongly warn of dangers. Nonetheless, there is  scientific evidence of health risks associated with parabens that goes beyond the controversy and the loud talk.

My advice on the issue, is that avoiding parabens whenever possible is a good idea.

Researchers from the Department of Biology and Biochemistry of Brunel University in the UK conducted a study that found that the alkyl hydroxy benzoate preservatives (that is, methyl-, ethyl-, propyl-, and butylparaben) are weakly estrogenic. In other words, these preservatives have the ability to mimic estrogen in the body. They found butylparaben to be the most estrogenic. The study found that parabens can cause these adverse (oestrogenic) effects when injected under the skin of laboratory animals. The researchers believe that parabens that might be absorbed through the skin of pregnant women may act like an alien female hormone, affecting the development of the fetus, especially in regard to male fetuses’ future fertility. Professor John Sumpter, one of the researchers, wrote an article in The Independent where he expressed concerns that parabens may play a role in explaining why sperm counts have been falling in men and breast cancer in women is on the rise. However, the professor noted that the clinical results were based on animal studies only, and that human trials have not been done.

All Organic Apoteke products are free of parabens.

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Organic Eye Cream : Treat dark under-eye circles

Friday, June 18th, 2010

What causes dark under-eye circles?

Dark under-eye circles begin with the capillaries around the eyes, these are the tiny blood vessels found in the delicate skin around the eyes. Capillaries are so small that red blood cells sometimes have to line up, single file, to get through. Anything that causes damage to the delicate wall of these capillaries will cause the red blood cells to enter the surrounding tissue. This isn’t a problem – it happens all the time – and your body has a mechanism to mop up these red blood cells. Enzymes in your body break down these red blood cells, including their hemoglobin (the molecule that gives them their distinctive red color). This is all fantastic, except for one thing: when hemoglobin is broken down, its remaining components have a dark blue-black color. Just like a bruise. So your dark under-eye circles are actually caused by leaky capillaries.

Dark under-eye circles are like bruises

When something hits you, blood vessels are traumatized and sometimes broken. Blood leaks out into the surrounding skin. Your body begins the mopping-up process, and you see a dark, purplish or blue-black discoloration. Dark under-eye circles are very similar to bruises because the same mechanisms produce them.

Why are dark under-eye circles so visible?

Capillaries all over your body are leaking small amounts of blood all the time, but are not very noticeable. The reason dark under-eye circles are so apparent is the skin around the eyes is the thinnest, skin of your entire body. The capillaries are therefore much closer to the surface of the skin there. The skin around the eye is not only thinner but also more translucent both making dark circle more visible.

The combination of capillaries near the skin’s surface and translucent skin makes this discoloration much more apparent. And that’s why you have those dark under-eye circles staring back at you in the mirror.

What makes dark under-eye circles more obvious?

Any damage to the under eye capillaries can aggravate the appearance of dark under-eye circles.  Allergic reactions may also cause capillary damage. Also there may be an underlying medical condition that results in capillaries being easily damaged. Speak to your medical practitioner about this.

What can you do to reduce the appearance of dark under-eye circles?

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Organic Face Cream : Ingredients to avoid – Read your organic skin care labels

Wednesday, June 16th, 2010

With skin care ingredients not being very well regulated, we find so many harmful chemicals finding their way into products we use daily. Even products that claim to be natural or organic can sometimes contain these harmful toxic ingredients.

Although the list is long here are a few of the worst offenders that definitely need to be avoided especially of the product claims to be a natural or organic face cream.

Diazolidinyl Urea

Used as an antiseptic in cosmetics. It may release formaldehyde, known to be highly toxic.

*Found in: body powders, cleansers and soaps, lotions and moisturizers, make-up and make-up removers, shampoo, shaving products, sunscreen.

Imidazolidinyl Urea

The second most commonly used preservative in personal care products (parabens are first). The American Academy of Dermatology recognizes it as a cause of contact dermatitis. Formaldehyde release is a hazard of this chemical. The CIR Expert Panel is reassessing its safety.

*Found in: baby and other shampoos, bath and body oils body powders, colognes and other fragrances, lotions and moisturizers, makeup, permanent waves, and rinses.

Diethanolamine (DEA)

Extensively used for its emulsifying and foaming properties. Associated with allergic reactions and eye irritation. The combination of DEA and DEA-related ingredients is associated with cancer in lab animals. The FDA is currently investigating this link.

Triethanolamine(TEA)

Used as a detergent and dispersing agent. There is high sensitivity to its use. Prolonged contact is particularly irritating. Toxic to lab animals. The CIR Expert Panel recommends use only in small, concentrations, not to exceed over 5%. They also recommend limiting it to rinse off products, such as shampoo. However, some hand and body lotions include it. Combining TEA with nitrates results in cancer-causing nitrosamines.

*DEA and TEA are found in: bath powders, lotions, shaving creams, shampoos, and soaps.

Parabens: Ethyl, Butyl, Methyl, Propyl, and Parahydroxybenzoate

Parabens are the second most common ingredient in skin care products … water is first. The most widely used preservatives in the United States, they may cause skin rashes and other allergic reactions.

Studies show they possess mild estrogen-like qualities. Preliminary research uncovered parabens in human breast cancer tumors. This does not prove a causal relationship, however. Parabens are ubiquitous. They are an estimated 75-90% of all personal care products. Even many so called “natural” and some organic skin care products contain parabens (check labels!).

There is a gradual phase out of these preservatives occurring in the natural skin care industry. Preservatives are essential. However, there are all natural, nontoxic preservatives that are both safe and effective.

*Found in: baby preparations, cleansers, deodorants, eye-products, lotions and moisturizers, make-up, personal lubricants, nail products, shampoos and other hair products, and sunscreens.

Petrolatum

Also known as petroleum jelly. Purified petroleum is common to moisturizers and other cosmetic products. It forms an oily layer on the skin that prevents moisture evaporation. It purportedly smooths and moisturizers skin, but often has the opposite effect. It causes allergic reactions in some. Manufactures love petrolatum because it is very inexpensive (read: a cheap addition for manufacturers).

*Found in: baby creams, conditioners, creams and moisturizers, makeup, nail products, and wax depilatories.

Propylene Glycol

This is the most common moisture-carrying ingredient, excluding water itself, in personal care products. Extensively used in makeup. It is known to elicit allergic reactions, including hives, and is associated with eczema. Safer glycols are gradually replacing propylene glycol. The CIR Expert Panel maintains its safety in concentrations up to 50%.

*Found in: antiperspirants and deodorants, baby lotions, hair strengtheners, moisturizers, mouthwashes, shaving products, sunscreens, and stick perfumes.

PVP/VA Copolymer

Considered toxic. Some individuals develop thesaurosis, which is foreign bodies in the lung, due to inhalation of PVP in hairspray. Rats ingested intravenously with PVP developed tumors.

*Found largely in: bronzers, eye makeup, and hair products.

Sodium Lauryl Sulfate

A detergent, emulsifier, and wetting agent. It is drying and often irritating to skin. Associated with eczema. The Journal of the American College of Toxicology states this chemical has a “degenerative effect on the cell membranes because of its protein denaturing properties” and that “high levels of skin penetration may occur at even low use concentration.” The CIR Expert Panel is reassessing it for safety.

*Found in: bubble baths, emollient creams, cream depilatories, hand lotions, permanent waves, shampoos, soaps, and toothpastes.

Sodium Laureth Sulfate

Acts as a water softener and a foaming and wetting agent. Often in products designed for mildness, such as baby shampoos. Yet it leads to eye and skin irritation in some. The CIR Panel is reexamining its position on this chemical also.

*Found in: shampoos, including baby shampoos.

Stearalkonium Chloride

The Fabric industry developed this as a fabric softener. It softens hair, allowing easier combing. Known to cause allergic reactions and irritation to the skin, eyes, and mucous membranes. Considered toxic. CIR Expert Panel is reassessing for safety guidelines.

*Found in: hair conditioners and creams.

Synthetic colors

Unlike most ingredients used by the industry, synthetic colors are regulated by the FDA. Yet, most are derived from coal tar. Many people are allergic to coal tar. Of greater significance is the association of coal tar and cancer. Most all coal tars cause cancer when subcutaneously injected in lab mice. In fact, many formerly approved colors are now banned in the US because of recognized carcinogenic properties.

Used in a large variety of personal care products, most notably hair dyes. What color is that drugstore shampoo … neon green anyone? Nontoxic all natural skincare products, as opposed to traditional skin care, rely on botanical ingredients for subtle color. This is one of the reasons that Organic Apoteke products vary in color, we are dependent on the combined colors of the natural ingredients we use which vary due to weather conditions and the plants unique manufacturing facility.

Synthetic Fragrances

There may be up to 200 ingredients encompassed by the term “fragrance”. Furthermore, manufactures are not required to disclose actual ingredients in their formulas. They receive protection for such proprietary formulas. Reactions to fragrance in personal care include: coughing, dizziness, headaches, hyper-pigmentation, rash, skin irritation, and vomiting.

I can personally vouch for hyper-pigmentation. I have seen unsightly brown spots on necks of many patients which disappeared when they stopped applying perfume there.

*Synthetic fragrances lurk in the majority of traditional personal care products. Even many so called natural products use synthetic fragrance. To be safe, look for 100% “all natural skin care products.” Natural essential oils are the ideal fragrance.

Organic Apoteke products do not contain any of the above ingredients.

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Organic Eye Cream : Preventing Bags under the eyes

Thursday, June 10th, 2010

Skin loses some of its elasticity with age, and muscles within the eyelids lose tone causing what is known as bags under the eyes or puffiness. In addition fat can build up in the eyelid and fluids can accumulate and cause swelling. Puffiness around the eyes can also be caused by allergies or excessive salt consumption. Smoking as well can aggravate this problem.

Here are a few quick tips to help reduce under eye bags or puffiness.

Avoid drinking fluids before bed.

Avoid monosodium glutamate and reduce your salt intake.

Do not smoke and reduce second hand smoke.

Get plenty of sleep

Apply a chilled gel compress or a washcloth soaked in iced water over the eyes. Cold cucumber slices also work. The cold shrinks the swollen blood vessels.

For long term prevention, use eye creams that strengthen the skin and help build the collagen and elastin around the eye area. Eye creams containing bilberry help strengthen the blood vessels and tone veins which prevent puffiness.

Organic Apoteke sells an anti aging organic eye cream containing bilberry that targets under eye puffiness, dark circles, wrinkles and fine lines.

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Organic Eye Cream for Men

Wednesday, June 9th, 2010

Organic Eye Cream for Men

Organic Eye Cream for Men

Since the post “Organic Eye Cream :  When should you start using an eye cream?” went out yesterday, we have had a flurry of emails with questions and many of these came from men.

In response:

While men do tend to have thicker facial skin with a higher density of sebaceous glands, the skin around their eyes is thin. Therefore men do need to use an eye cream twice daily, morning and evening from as early as possible. If you start in your teenage years its best, but its never too late to prevent further damage.

Because men have thicker skin on their face, they tend not to develop the fine lines that women do. This makes it all the more important to use a good organic eye cream as the area around the eyes is generally the first area where lines and wrinkles develop.

Guys, this can give your age away.

When choosing a good organic eye cream, the same rules apply for both men and women. Choose an eye cream with a nourishing gel like consistency. Heavy and thick creams can make the eyes appear puffy. Ensure the eye cream is alcohol free, even organic alcohol should be avoided. For added benefits use an eye cream that contain ingredients like bilberry and eyebright.

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Organic Eye Cream : When should you start using an Eye Cream?

Tuesday, June 8th, 2010

One question I get asked very often by younger customers is “when should they start using an eye cream?”. There seems to be a misconception that you only need to use and eye cream in your thirties or when the first fine lines begin to appear. The answer is, at that stage its already a bit late. The skin around the eyes is extremely thin and it also does not have the benefit of underlying muscle to hold it taught. Hence it needs all the help it can get. You need to use an eye cream from as early as possible. Choose a good organic eye cream that is nourishing but light in consistency.  Thick and heavy eye creams can do more damage than good in this delicate area.

Organic Eye Cream

Organic Eye Cream

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Rejuvenating Starter Kit containing Organic Eye Cream on Sale at www.amazon.co.uk

Friday, June 4th, 2010

Organic Apoteke’s rejuvenating starter kit contains all you need to get your skin glowing. An organic cotton toiletry bag holds the following 6 products.

  • Buttermilk Cleanser 15ml
  • Balancing Rose Toner 15ml
  • Rejuvenating Face Cream 15ml
  • Rasayana Rejuvenating Serum 5ml
  • Organic Eye Cream 5ml
  • Organic Rejuvenating Face Mask 5ml
Rejuvenating Starter Kit

Rejuvenating Starter Kit

This great kit gives you Organic Apoteke’s complete rejuvenating regime. Whether you are new to Organic Apoteke and would like to try the products or are an ardent fan and need smaller sizes to take on holiday. This kit is perfect for you. The kit gives you enough product for about 3 weeks. Each of these products have wonderful anti-aging benefits. However when used in combination optimal results are seen.

www.amazon.co.uk is launching the Organic Apoteke range by offering the Rejuvenating Starter Kit at £19.95.  It normally retails at £29.95. Click here to benefit from this offer.

PS: This kit also makes a wonderful gift. Whether you are looking for fantastic stocking stuffer on the cheap or that perfect beach bag cosmetic kit, this is perfect.

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Natural Skin Care : The dangers of Phenoxyethanol

Thursday, June 3rd, 2010

Phenoxyethanol, glycol ether often derived from natural sources, is a popular antibacterial and preservative chemical, used by many so called natural and organic skin care brands. It  is also used in many vaccines and bug repellants.

A few beauty brands marketed as the greenest in the industry use phenoxyethanol as a preservative, suggesting that it is derived from grapefruit. Well, cocamide DEA is derived from coconut but this doesn’t make it any less toxic!

Chemically known as ethylene glycol phenyl ether or ethylene glycol monophenyl ether, phenoxyethanol is an ethoxylated compound that may be contaminated with carcinogenic toxin 1,4-Dioxane.

According to Journal of Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology, phenoxyethanol affected brain and nervous system in animals at moderate doses. In 1990 Journal of the American College of Toxicology reported that phenoxyethanol also acts as an endocrine disruptor that also caused damage to bladder and acute pulmonary edema in animals. Early 1980s studies also suggest that phenoxyethanol can cause DNA mutations – again, only in animals, as it was not tested on humans.

Phenoxyethanol is a scientifically proven irritant to human skin and eyes (Comparison of objective and sensory skin irritations of several cosmetic preservatives. Lee E, An S, Choi D, Moon S, Chang I. Contact Dermatitis. 2007 Mar;56(3):131-6.) and it is classified as irritant in European Union. Phenoxyethanol is also restricted for use in Japan.

No matter what the studies say, phenoxyethanol is deemed perfectly safe for use in cosmetics in the U.S. and UK in concentrations of up to 1 percent. This means, a 200 ml bottle of shampoo contains a teaspoon of phenoxyethanol!

The most surprising it that the Soil Association, the organic certification body in the UK permits the use of phenoxyethanol in products that it certifies organic. Please read the organic ingredients on products.

All Organic Apoteke products are free of phenoxyethanol and phenoxyethanol residues.

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Natural Skin Care : Interview with Lauren Fornes

Wednesday, May 26th, 2010
Lauren Fornes

Lauren Fornes

Lauren Fornes is an esthetician and one of the most charming people we have met since bringing Organic Apoteke to the US in 2007. Lauren’s much loved blog Faceparlour is informative and smart, and is morphing into something new and exciting: The Skinny (a private sale site that offers luxury skin care at affordable prices).

We had a chat with Lauren as she gets ready to offer Organic Apoteke (from Nov 11th to the 18th).

What do you look for in a skin care products?
Right now I’m pregnant, so given that I look for a combination of safe and effective ingredients.

With winter coming up what type of product do you recommend?
Most people tend to have drier skin, so I recommend switching to more nourishing products. The easiest way to do this is usually with a cleanser. If you use a cleansing gel or a foaming cleanser, switch to a cleansing milk or cream. You could also consider switching to a richer moisturizer, if your skin feels tight immediately after application.

Are there any ingredients that you look for in your fall and winter skin care products?
In the fall and winter I like to feel cozy, so I am drawn to scents that are cozy like rose, and chamomile and mint. I find those charming in the winter.

Your first experience with Organic Apoteke was with our Buttermilk Cleanser, which you gave a very high score (the highest ever, I believe) what do you look for in a cleanser?
At the time I was rating products based on three criteria: safety, efficacy and sustainability. This product scored remarkably high in all three categories. Additionally, on the marketing side, it didn’t over-sell or over-promise, which is a common tendency is skin care.

Why did you give it (Buttermilk Cleanser) such a high rating?
It is not hard to create an effective cleanser. But many of the cleaning agents (surfactants and the like) are the same ingredients you use to clean your car or your dishes. Your skin is more sensitive. The ingredients may get absorbed into your bloodstream. It’s important to maintain the effectiveness but without the harshness. Your Buttermilk Cleanser was light and creamy, a very good natural, holistic alternative.

Is there any other Organic Apoteke product that just can’t live without?
I love the Sicilian Orange and Mandarin Body Cleanse Gel and Body Hydrate oil. They both live in my shower.

You’re pregnant, congratulations! How has this affected your approach to personal care products?
The moment I found out I was pregnant I cried with joy and panicked a little…it was one thing to expose myself toxic ingredients, but I couldn’t do that to this tiny person inside me. I went through the bathroom cabinet and got rid of all the junk, then headed to a local organic home store and bought all the safe and effective alternatives.

You recently started The Skinny.  What is it and how does it work?
You (and possibly your readers) are familiar with the sample sale craze (Gilt Groupe, Hautelook, etc). We’re similar, except we’re focused exclusively on luxury skin care at affordable prices (up to 70% off retail). You can join at www.shoptheskinny.com. As a member, you receive weekly emails announcing a new brand shopping event. This week we’re featuring Organic Apoteke, so I’m sure your readers will be excited!

How is going?
It is going really well. We’ve been written up by Daily Candy, Cooking Light Magazine. Plus, we’re getting amazing feedback from our members – that is the most encouraging part.

Organic Apoteke offers a full range of natural and organic facial skincare including organic facial cleansers and organic eye cream.

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